Journal of Ecology and Environment

pISSN 2287-8327 eISSN 2288-1220

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Published online August 7, 2019
https://doi.org/10.1186/s41610-019-0128-1

Journal of Ecology and Environment (2019) 43:31

© The Ecological Society of Korea.

Studies on the changes in phenological, growth and physiological responses of Silene capitata Kom., an endangered plant in Korea, under climate change treatment

Jae-Hoon Park1,2, Young-Sub Han1,3, Eung-Pil Lee1, Seung-Yeon Lee1, Heon-Mo Jeong4 and Young-Han You1

Department of Biological Science, Kongju National University, Gongju-si, Republic of Korea; K-water Institute, KWATER, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; Division of Ecological Survey Research, National Institute of Ecology, Seocheon-gun, Republic of Korea; Division of Ecosystem Service and Research Planning, National Institute of Ecology, Seocheon-gun, Republic of Korea

Correspondence to:Young-Han You

Received: March 25, 2019; Accepted: July 21, 2019

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Abstract

Background

This research aims to study the effect of climate change on the phenology, growth, and physiological traits of Silene capitata Kom., a Korean endangered species II. This study increased CO2 concentration in a closed glass greenhouse, with the daily mean temperature and CO2 concentration respectively being 4.61 °C and 93.63 ppm higher than the outside temperature (ambient conditions, control). The seeds of S. capitata were sown in control and treatment environments in March 2013 while seedlings were transplanted into individual pots in May 2013. To research phenological changes, the first day of the flowering and ripening of the plants transplanted in 2013 and first day of leafing in 2014 were observed. The growth and physiological responses of mature leaves were also studied in 2013.>

Results

There was no difference in the first day of flowering, but the first day of ripening was earlier in the treatment group than the control group. There was no difference in the number of rosette leaves between the two groups, but leaf area was wider in the treatment group than the control group. Transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were higher in the treatment group than the control group, chlorophyll content decreased, and photosynthetic rate and water use efficiency were the same for both groups. As a result of simple regression analysis among the transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rate, and water use efficiency, stomatal conductance increased when transpiration rate increased. Stomatal conductance increased with photosynthetic rate in the control unlike in the treatment group. The photosynthetic rate and water use efficiency increased with transpiration rate in the control group unlike in the treatment group. Furthermore, water use efficiency increased as photosynthetic rate increased in both groups.>

Conclusion

Due to high CO2 concentration, the photosynthetic rate was no longer controlled by the stomata, which appeared to suppress the excessive production of photosynthetic products by reducing chlorophyll content. It is believed that the phenological responses of S. capitata under climate change conditions will advance and that stable growth will be difficult in regions lacking moisture due to the high transpiration rate.

Keywords: Caryophyllaceae, CO2 concentration, Ecophysiology, Global warming, Perennial herb

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Journal of Ecology and Environment

pISSN 2287-8327 eISSN 2288-1220